Transparency in Maple Heights

#TBT: Strategic Master Plan from 1999

In 1999, the city administration, elected officials and resident committees partnered with PKG to develop a Strategic Master Plan for the City of Maple Heights. The plan recognized that things were changing for the older inner ring suburbs of Cleveland and that a strategic plan for (re)development was a necessity. These changes addressed everything from planning and zoning/building code to budgeting to resident demographics.

You can view a copy of the Strategic Master Plan. Below is an outline identifying the page number (in the PDF) where each section starts. Take a look and see which recommendations became a reality in the past 15 years, which ones have long since been forgotten or become completely obsolete due to progress in a different direction.

Chapter 1: Introduction/Overview (2)

  • real estate trends
  • land use
  • (re)investment by both the public and private sector
  • 5 committees:
    • economic development
    • education
    • land use
    • public facilities and programs
    • public services and programs
  • The committees identified community concerns:
    • maximize freeway access
    • senior housing and assisted living
    • rehab parks and facilities
    • civic center that serves all ages
    • reassessment of existing services
    • future budget priorities

Chapter 2: Resident Survey Results (7)

10% response rate that represented the current demographic age of residents.

Most Appealing (9)

<40 40-65 >65
location 1 1 1
recreation/community activities 2
affordability 3 4
safety services 3 2 2
nice neighborhood 4 3

 

Least Appealing (10)

<40 40-65 >65
public schools 1 1
quality shopping 2 4
property care 3 2 1
noise 3 2

 

Motivation to Move to Maple Heights
(within the in last 10 years) (10)

<40 40-65 >65
1 affordability location location
2 location affordability & quiet family
3 family nice neighborhoods affordability

Categories that received a “could be improved” rating (15)

  • public schools
  • cable
  • roads
  • building code enforcement

Areas to be redeveloped

  1. Southgate
  2. Broadway

Household income (20)

  • Most respondents in the $35,000-$50,000 for all age groups.
 #FunFact:  1998 was the first year For Sale Signs were permitted. 

Business’ desired by residents:

  • quality shopping
  • grocery stores
  • full service restaurants

Praise for:

  • Mayor
  • Safety Services

West Jr. High Possibilities20150614_122541

  • Civic Center
  • Assisted Living Facility
  • Charter School

Results from the survey’s findings that were implemented into Master Plan:

  • Marketing of location
  • Property Maintenance Code enforcement
  • park and recreation are important to <40 category.
  • road improvements important for redevelopment of commercial areas
  • Auto sales are geared toward vehicular traffic, not pedestrian.
  • proposed “new” post office
  • Relationship with schools

Chapter 2 Appendix: Original Survey (29)

Chapter 3: Data Analysis (32)

Population/Housing

  • Continuing population decline
  • Elderly population increasing
  • appropriate housing for the aging population
  • home sales increase as older residents homes are sold

If there is not a continued strong demand for these houses, residential property values may begin to show depreciation.

  • no housing choices for higher-income buyers
    • In 1987, 35% of residents who sold a Maple Heights home, purchased another home in Maple Heights. By 1997, that number had dropped to 13%.
    • In 1999, those residents who stayed sold their home at $66,000 and purchased a new Maple Heights home for $87,000. More were moving to outer ring suburbs.
  • Sidewalk survey (exterior inspection) of all properties every 2 years. Full rental (interior) survey every 3 years.

Economic Development & Budgeting (36)

Land use and economic development policies will not achieve the desired goals if they are not grounded in market reality.

  • industrial tax base decreased 26% from 1983 to 1998
  • residential accounts for 77% of the tax basis value
  • anticipating elimination and reduction of taxes by the state
  • revenue is consistent over the past 5 years
  • expenses increasing

Chapter 3 Appendix (supporting data tables) (47)

Chapter 4: Master Plan (73)

Target Broadway Corridor for re-development and create a new “center” of Maple Heights

  • New Post Office
  • Community Center
  • Adjacent land for residential development

Residential

  • location and affordability
  • Community recreation center & quality open space
  • Strict property maintenance code enforcement

Planning and Zoning Codes

  • Updating code and enforcing those regulations is a cost effective way to foster re-investment and quality development.

Land Use Concept Plan

Introduction: can realistically be meet in the next 5-10 years. 6 land use concept areas.

Overall Goals & Recommendations

  • increase revenue generation potential
  • increase percentage of regional housing market investment
  • establish positive relationships between the City, the Board of Education and residents and business
  • create through public investment a new “city center”
  • improve transportation safety, accessibility and pedestrian friendly environment
  • achieve consistent investment by updating planning and zoning code
  • obtain property for redevelopment in target areas
  1. Residential Core Neighborhoods (77)

    • green space, buffers
    • enforcing property maintenance codes
    • pedestrian oriented commercial uses in properties adjacent to residential neighborhoods
    • development of new residential, senior and assisted living facilities
    • funding levels for building department that allows for bi annual exterior inspections of residential properties, interior inspections of apartments every 3 years, and tracking of single family rental units.
    • eliminate residential uses on Broadway
  2. Southgate Retail Core (79)

    • improve transportation safety and accessibility (road improvements)
    • encourage high-traffic, freeway-oriented uses
  3. Retail Corridor Target Areas (79):

    • Warrensville and Northfield
      • improve transportation safety and accessibility (road improvements)
      • encourage high-traffic, freeway-oriented uses
      • property maintenance code enforcement
      • update planning and zoning code
      • require landscape buffers between commercial and residential
    • Lee-Libby
      • property maintenance code enforcement and zoning regulations
      • encourage participation in property improvement programs
      • encourage low traffic-generating, pedestrian oriented commercial uses
      • phase out multi family uses on Lee north of LibbyLee-Libby
  4. Neighborhood Commercial Districts: Lee/Rockside, Rockside/Dunham, Turney/Dunham, East 141st/Granger (81)

  • property maintenance code enforcement and zoning regulations
  • encourage participation in property improvement programs
  • encourage low traffic-generating, pedestrian oriented commercial uses
  1. Office/Industrial Campuses & Office/Institutional (81)

  • North/South Industrial & Dunham
  • Broadway
  • Norfolk Southern Railroad
  • Pennsylvania Ave Industrial Park
  • tax abatement program criteria
  • performance based zoning regulations
  • permit development of high-traffic generating uses (Broadway, Norfolk Southern)
  • identify brownfield sites
  • update planning and zoning code. eliminate outdoor storage.
  • task force to consider reuse of obsolete buildings
  • development agreements must generate a minimum number of jobs/acre
  • buffer between Norfolk Southern and residential. Allow for future bike-hike path.
  1. Broadway Avenue Corridor (83)

  • improve aesthetic appearance
  • implement phase I and II
  • assemble parcels for new public investment: new city center and post office
  • encourage low traffic-generating, pedestrian oriented commercial uses
  • require landscape buffers between commercial and residential
  • property maintenance code enforcement and zoning regulations
  • encourage participation in property improvement programs
  • eliminate expansion of conflicting use (residential)
  • update planning and zoning code. eliminate outdoor storage.
  • buffer between Norfolk Southern and residential. Allow for future bike-hike path.
  • permit development of high-traffic generating uses (Broadway, Norfolk Southern)

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4 Responses to #TBT: Strategic Master Plan from 1999

  1. Helen June 26, 2015 at 12:06 am #

    This is 15 years old why publish? You can not compare this to 2015. Economic of the whole country have changed as they have in Maple Hts. Let’s update to today’s economics and the needs of the public.

    • Lynde Brownlee June 26, 2015 at 5:26 pm #

      First, due the Master Plan the P&Z code was reviewed and updated in 2000- that is the code that current P&Z decisions are made on (with the exceptions of updates that have happened since then). This makes the rational (the Master Plan) behind those changes important.
      Second, the resident survey and data analysis are insightful and historical. Some of the analysis is spot on: specifically about the housing stock.
      Third, you are right, the City needs to update its Master Plan to today’s economy and needs of the public.

  2. stophypocrisy June 26, 2015 at 10:15 am #

    Once again the Brownlee clan is bringing up inane insignificant data…. Kasich wasn’t governor either when this plan was created – no way to predict the massive cuts in state funding he would impose. What is the Brownlee clans motivation for this particular posting? I suspect to simply smear the people currently in power as their campaign for mayor starts up.

    • Lynde Brownlee June 26, 2015 at 5:31 pm #

      Kasich became Governor in 2011. By then, it was anticipated that most of the Master Plan would have been carried out. Second, most of the people currently in power didn’t have anything to do with the creation of the Master Plan.

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